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Road Trip 101: No Matter Where You’re Coming From, There’s A Scenic Route To Angel Fire Resort

March 12, 2021

Feeling cooped up? The best way to relieve yourself of that sensation is by traveling our great nation’s great highways. So pack up the car and hit the road with Angel Fire Resort as your destination. Regardless of where you’re coming from, there’s a scenic adventure to be had on the way to Northern New Mexico. And we have the directions to prove it! 

Come On Over, Ya’ll: How to Get to Angel Fire Resort from Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana

Roads to Travel:

lighthouse

Photo courtesy of palodurocanyon.com

  • US 287 (TX)
  • I-40
  • NM 104
  • NM 518
  • NM 434

Places to Go and Things to Do:

  • Cadillac Ranch (Amarillo, TX)
  • Route 66 Museum (Tucumcari, NM)
  • Conchas Lake State Park (NM)
  • Las Vegas, NM

The westward journey to Angel Fire Resort evokes the road trips of yesteryear. It starts by taking US 287 through West Texas to I-40. Several Texas State Parks are accessible via this road, including Lake Arrowhead, Copper Breaks (once the domain of the Comanche and Kiowa tribes), and Palo Duro Canyon — a.k.a., the Grand Canyon of Texas and the second largest canyon in the United States.

As you approach Amarillo, you’ll soon discover that the Interstate follows the path of the historic Route 66. Although the speed limit has been set to make travel as efficient as possible, take your time. This iconic drive offers lots to see along the way. 

Just outside of Amarillo sits Cadillac Ranch, one of the most unique art installations anywhere. Get out, stretch your legs, and gander at this strange garden of half-buried, graffiti-covered, vintage Coup de Villes, Fleetwoods, Eldorados, and more. 

You next stop awaits just across the Texas-New Mexico state line. With a population of just over 5,000 citizens, Tucumcari may be tiny, but its downtown murals — of which there are many — are sure to impress. Tucumcari is also a great place to learn more about the “Mother Road.” Visit the Route 66 Museum and check out some of the original motels (like the Blue Swallow) in all their neon-hued glory. 

Lake-Arrowhead_0069

Photo courtesy of tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/lake-arrowhead

Adventure-seekers take note: leaving Tucumcari, bypass I-40 and head north on NM 104, otherwise known as New Mexico’s loneliest road. This scenic highway may seem like it’s going nowhere, but it rewards travelers with spectacular views of the region’s mesas and canyons as well as traffic so light it might as well be non-existent. 

NM 104 also runs alongside one of the largest lakes in New Mexico — Conchas Lake. You don’t have to be a fisherman or a boater to enjoy these shores, either. You can simply walk the miles of beaches or picnic near one of its many coves. 

NM 104 peters out at Las Vegas, NM — home to an exceptionally quaint Old Town Historic District and a great place to grab a quick bite and a cup of coffee. Las Vegas is also your gateway to the Carson National Forest and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. 

From Las Vegas, take NM 518 to Mora, then 434 the rest of the way to Angel Fire Resort. Thanks to the back roads you’ve taken and sights you’ve seen along the way, you’ll have little trouble getting around like a local.

Out Of The Desert, Into The Mountains: How to Get to Angel Fire Resort from Albuquerque and Southern New Mexico 

Roads to Travel:

  • I-25
  • NM 4
  • NM 30
  • NM 76
  • NM 68

Places to Go and Things to Do:

  • Zia Pueblo
  • Jemez Springs
  • Bandelier National Monument
  • Chimayo
  • Taos

The trip from Albuquerque to Angel Fire may not look like an epic journey on the surface. But it definitely

Chimayo

Photo courtesy of www.holychimayo.us

affords travelers plenty of opportunities to experience the reasons why New Mexico is known as the Land of Enchantment. 

Your northbound route starts on I-25. Just north of Bernalillo, turn northwest on US 550 toward the Zia Pueblo — birthplace of the sun symbol that graces the New Mexico state flag and home to some of the state’s most renowned pottery artists. Visitors to the pueblo are welcome during daylight hours. 

Near San Ysidro, US 550 becomes NM 4. Here the road runs north into the vast Sante Fe National Forest and the Jemez Mountains. Points of interest include the restorative waters of Jemez Springs, Los Alamos’s Bradbury Science Museum (where you can learn all about the Manhattan Project) and the ancient cliff dwellings at Bandelier National Monument.

At Espanola, hook up with NM 76 to El Santuario de Chimayo. This early 19th Century chapel is a major pilgrimage site for Catholics across North America. The soil from the surrounding area is considered holy and is reputed to have healing powers. Miracles aside, the milagros, retablos, and other devotional objects lining the passage to “el pocito,” the shrine from which parishioners may take a pinch of Chimayo’s holy dirt, are marvels worth making the trip to see.

Remain on NM 76, also known as the High Road to Taos. Once you reach Taos, take the time to walk its picturesque streets — and square. Take in a spa treatment, hit one of their renowned restaurants, or just simply relax and absorb the town’s energy. 

Finally, take the Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway to Angel Fire Resort. Whether you take the long way around through Questa and Eagle Nest or the short route through Valle Escondido, you’ll still find a family-friendly four-season resort waiting for you at our mountain. 

Southbound To The Southern Rockies: How to Get To Angel Fire Resort from Colorado

Roads to Travel:

  • I-25
  • US 64
  • NM 434

Places to Go and Things to Do:

  • Bishop Castle (Pueblo, CO)
  • Louden-Henritze Archaeology Museum (Trinidad, CO)
  • Eagle Nest, NM

Summer ActivitiesIf you’re one of our neighbors to the north, get ready to experience breathtaking vistas and exciting off-the-beaten-path pit stops on your way to our mountain. As you take I-25 South, you’ll pass through the many charming Southern Colorado towns, all with their own quirks and charms. 

Take a break in Pueblo and check out the ever evolving Bishop Castle. This whimsical project is the vision and handiwork of one man, Jim Bishop. As he continues to build and add salvaged elements to the castle, people flock to explore all that its nooks and crannies hold — including a fire-breathing dragon! 

Back on I-25, you’ll make your way to Trinidad, once a major stop on the Sante Fe Trail that’s home to the Louden-Henritze Archaeology Museum. There, you can view dinosaur bones and other fossils while learning about the fascinating geological forces that have shaped the American Southwest. 

Continue south until you hit Raton, NM, then exit onto Highway 64 toward Cimarron. From there you’ll take Highway 434 to Angel Fire. Before you reach your destination, however, treat yourself to a stop in Eagle Nest. Their Western-style downtown boasts a traditional saloon — complete with swinging doors — as well as many shops, restaurants, and other attractions. If you can’t wait until you get to Angel Fire for a taste of nature, detour to Eagle Nest Lake State Park to take in the gorgeous crystal blue water and crisp air. 

Now you’re just a quick 12-mile jaunt from Angel Fire Resort, where you can enjoy winter sports in the snowy months or, once the sun comes out, summer activities like mountain biking, ziplining, golf, and more. We pride ourselves on being a family vacation destination for all seasons!

West By Southwest: How to Get to Angel Fire Resort from California, Nevada, and Arizona

Roads to Travel:

Zion

Photo courtesy of www.nps.gov

  • I-15
  • SR-9 (UT)
  • US 89 & 89A
  • SR 389 (AZ)
  • US 160
  • US 64
  • US 550
  • NM 96
  • US 84

Road Trip Highlights

  • Valley of Fire (NV)
  • Zion National Park (UT)
  • Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (AZ)
  • Shiprock (NM)
  • Los Luceros Historic Site (NM)
  • Black Mesa Winery (NM)

Embarking on a long-haul road trip eastward from Las Vegas, NV or Southern California may seem like a trek-and-a-half, but it rewards those who take it with views of some of the Southwest’s most majestic marvels.

GOK_abiquiu_bedroom_290A6244-scaled-1200×630

Photo courtesy of www.okeeffemuseum.org

Head north on I-15 from Vegas and watch as the flat expanses of the Mojave Desert evolve into the red — and carved — rocks of the Valley of Fire. Just outside of Washington, UT, you’ll jump on SR 9 heading east. This is where the scenery really begins to turn spectacular, provided you’re OK with making a few short detours. The payoff? The southern tip of Zion National Park and, once you turn south on US 89 (and 89A), Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. Those of you whose vehicles are equipped with four-wheel drive will definitely want to explore this unique wilderness. 

Near Page, AZ, you’ll link up with SR 389, which will take you to US 160 and, finally, US 64. Now that you’re in New Mexico, Shiprock should be your first stop. All that remains of an ancient volcano, Shiprock towers 7,000 feet above the desert floor and has been celebrated in Navajo lore for generations.

Continue east toward Farmington to US 550, which winds southeast through the Navajo nation. Around La Jara, you’ll veer north on NM 96 as it skirts the northern edge of the Valles Caldera National Preserve. NM 96 intersects with US 84 just west of Abiquiu — where famed artist Georgia O’Keeffe’s home and studio still stand — and connects to NM 68 at the pueblo of Ohkay Owingeh. 

Now you’re on the home stretch! Along the way you’ll find a painstakingly preserved hacienda at the Los Luceros Historic Site and award-winning vintages at Black Mesa Winery. You’ll close out your trip on the mountainous switchbacks that lead into Angel Fire Resort. No doubt you’ll want to rest and recuperate after your long drive, a purpose for which our spacious and comfy rental homes have been designed.

What are you waiting for? Use this guide to start planning your spring break getaway or summer road trip to Angel Fire Resort today

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