Policies & Safety

Responsibility Code

Skier / Snowboarder Responsibility Code

Angel Fire Resort has endorsed and adopted the National Ski Areas Association’s “Your Responsibility Code,” which helps skiers and boarders become aware of the elements of risk inherent to snow sports. Common sense and personal awareness can help reduce this risk.

Seven Points to Your Responsibility Code:

  1. Always stay in control, and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.
  2. People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.
  3. You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
  4. Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
  5. Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  6. Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.
  7. Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.

KNOW THE CODE: IT’S YOUR RESPONSIBILITY. THIS IS A PARTIAL LIST. BE SAFETY CONSCIOUS.

Allowed On-Mountain Devices

View Winter Devices Allowed and Not Allowed or Restricted to find out which devices are allowed to be used on the mountain (ski slopes and chairlifts) and which devices are not allowed. All sliding devices including skis, snowboards, snowblades, and ski bikes must be equipped with a device to prevent runaway equipment (typically either ski brakes on skis or a leash on snowboards). Leashes are available for purchase in Slopeside.

Be GREAT on the Snow

Grow your skills. Take a Lesson!

Rock Your Helmet Every Day!

Embrace the Code. Know it and Show it!

Always Alert! – Avoid Collisions

Take Your Time – Avoid the Yard Sale –  Ski in Control!

Chairlift Safety and Kids on Lifts

It’s your responsibility to know how to use and ride the lift safely. Check out kidsonlifts.org for more great info. Here are some tips:

  • Need assistance? Ask the lift attendant for help. Smallest kids should load closest to the attendant.
  • Check for loose clothing/straps/equipment, remove and carry packs, remove ski pole straps from wrists.
  • Do not use phones, music or games while loading or unloading.
  • It is OK to miss a chair and wait for the next one.
  • When loading, watch for approaching chair and then sit to the back once seated!
  • Drop something? Let it FALL. Any item dropped can be picked up later.
  • Absolutely NO horseplay on the lifts!!

GET ON

As a chair passes you at the “Wait Here” sign, move ahead quickly to the “Load Here” sign and line up evenly. When the next chair comes behind you, sit on the seat, and slide back as far as you can – to keep from falling off the chair. If a footrest bar is available, lower it and wait to raise the bar until you see the sign “prepare to unload, raise the bar” at the top.

SIT BACK, SIT STILL, HOLD ON

Sit way back to keep from falling from the chair and enjoy the ride to the top! No horsing around, it’s dangerous when you are riding up in the air.

AT THE TOP, PLAN AHEAD TO UNLOAD

At the “Unload Here” sign it is time to get off. Stand up, and ski or walk down the ramp. Move out of the way quickly, so others can unload too.

THIS IS A PARTIAL LIST.  IT’S YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO ALWAYS BE SAFETY CONSCIOUS.

We Love Helmets!

Angel Fire Resort encourages all skiers and snowboarders to wear helmets designed for snow sports. Helmets are available to rent or purchase at Slopeside. Visit www.lidsonkids.org for more info.

On-Mountain Vehicles

Snowcats (snow grooming machines), snowmobiles, snowmaking and other equipment may be encountered on the slopes at any time. Stay clear. Give them space!

Reporting an Accident

Call Ski Patrol at 575-377-4209 or 575-377-4284 or have someone ski or ride to the base of the nearest lift and ask a lift operator to contact Patrol.

Patrol will want to know:

  • Where you are – be as exact as possible.
  • How many are hurt/involved
  • What is the complaint? Why does the person need help?
  • What type of injury?
  • How old is the person?
  • A description of the person.
  • If the person is unconscious, not breathing or has a head/neck/spine injury, please notify Ski Patrol of this immediately. DO NOT MOVE THE INJURED PERSON YOURSELF.

Collisions

You have duties under New Mexico Law (NM Ski Safety Act § 24-15-10 and Village Ord. 1989-11, 12-7-1989). If you are involved in a collision you must do the following:

  • Stop at the scene, render reasonable assistance, and notify Patrol immediately of any injury that takes place (call 575-377-4209 or 575-377-4284 or have someone ski or ride to the base of the nearest lift and ask a lift operator to contact Patrol).
  • Remain at the scene until a member of Patrol arrives
  • Provide a name and current address to Patrol before leaving the scene
  • If you are involved in a collision you must exchange information with the other person involved. Patrol can help facilitate the exchange following a collision

Ride Another Day Campaign – Prevent Collisions

#RideAnotherDay promotes 3 actions every skier and rider can take to help keep themselves and those around them safer on the slopes. These three actions are:

1. Be Ready –
Be ready to slow down or avoid objects or other people at any time. Ski and ride in such a way that you are always able to control yourself regardless of conditions and avoid others and objects you may encounter on the run, groomed or otherwise.

2. Stay Alert – 
Stay alert to what’s going on around you, especially other skiers and riders. Being aware of those around and changing conditions will help you have a fun and safe day on the hill.

3. Plan Ahead – 
Ease up at blind spots, check uphill when merging onto trails, and give other skiers plenty of room when passing. Look out for spots on the run where traffic merges or you can’t see what’s coming next. If you are unfamiliar with a run, take it easy the first time down it and make note of places where you’ll want to slow down, such as cat tracks and rollers. Also, give other skiers and riders lots or room, especially if you are passing them. There’s plenty of space out there, so there’s no need to crowd each other.

By doing these three things every run, you’ll be helping keep the slopes safe and enjoyable, for you and everyone else.

Sledding

Sledding is not permitted on the ski mountain or any resort property with the exception of the Kids Sledding Hill at the Nordic Center (Country Club).

Park SMART (Terrain Park Safety)

The most important part of any day in the park is making it home safely. Prior to using Freestyle Terrain, you are responsible for familiarizing yourself with the Freestyle Terrain and obeying all instructions, warnings and signs. Be aware that features change constantly due to snow conditions, weather, usage, grooming, and time of day. All Terrain Park users are expected to follow Park Smart:

START SMALL – Work your way up. Build your skills.

MAKE A PLAN – Every feature. Every time.

ALWAYS LOOK – Before you drop.

RESPECT – The features and other users.

TAKE IT EASY – Know your limits. Land on your feet.

Check out www.TerrainParkSafety.org for a comprehensive look at the Smart Style program. Angel Fire Resort designates features as small, medium, and large. These ratings are determined by degree of difficulty and are relative only to this resort. Know your limits and ability level and select the appropriate terrain.  Your actions can take you out of balance and cause serious injury or death, no matter how the feature is designed or where you land. Helmets are highly recommended and inverted aerials increase the chance of serious injury and death and are not recommended.

Drones

In the interest of the health, welfare and safety for our guests, employees, and property, Angel Fire Resort strictly prohibits the unauthorized use of drones and all other remote-controlled aircraft on its property.  This prohibition includes but is not limited to, Aircraft launched off-site that travels anywhere on or above Resort property. Written application may be made to the Resort Marketing Department requesting an exception to this prohibition. marketing@angelfireresort.com

Hours of Operation and Ski-In, Ski-Out Property

The mountain is open to skiing, hiking, and biking only during specified hours of operation. While the hours of operation vary from season to season, in general the mountain is only open when the chairlift(s) are running and open to the public. When the chairlift is not running, the mountain is closed. For safety reasons, do not access the mountain outside of hours of operation.

Uphill Mountain Access

Angel Fire Resort does not allow uphill skiing (skinning) without prior written authorization from management. Contact awhitacre@angelfireresort.com to request permission.

Closures

It is your responsibility to know what trails are open and what trails are closed. Trails can be closed with a rope and bamboo barrier or simply a “Closed” sign at the most likely entrance onto a run which is usually at the top. Ending up on a closed trail could result in your skiing privileges being suspended.

Accessibility

Check out our page on accessibility for more information relating to Angel Fire Resort and the ADA.

Altitude

In Angel Fire the elevation ranges from about 8,000 feet above sea level to just under 11,000 feet above sea level and due to the high elevation the air is thinner and less oxygen is available. People coming from lower elevations may experience altitude sickness which usually occurs within the first 48 hours. You may experience headaches, nausea, insomnia, and loss of appetite. The best remedy is to take it easy your first day here, increase fluid intake, decrease salt, alcohol and caffeine intake, and select high-carbohydrate, low-fat foods. Be aware that high elevation can also accentuate existing health problems. Seek medical assistance if symptoms persist or get worse.

Sun Safety

The sun’s intensity at this elevation is far greater than at sea level. There is 50% more UV Rays at 10,000 feet than at sea level. Always wear eye and skin protection, even on cloudy days. Kids need sunglasses too.

NM Skier Safety Act (NM Ski Safety Act § 24-15-10)

New Mexico Legislature established as a matter of law that certain dangers and risks are inherent in the sport of skiing and snowboarding. Under New Mexico law, a skier assumes the risk of any injury to person or property resulting from any of the inherent dangers and risks of skiing and snowboarding and may not recover from any ski area operator for any injury resulting from any of the inherent dangers and risks of skiing including: variations in terrain; snow or ice conditions; bare spots; rocks, trees or other forms of forest growth or debris; lift towers and components thereof, pole lines and snow-making equipment. Each skier shall have the sole individual responsibility for knowing the range of his own ability to negotiate any slope or trail, and it is the duty of each skier to ski within the limits of the skier’s own ability, to maintain reasonable control of speed and course at all times while skiing, to heed all posted warnings, to ski only on a skiing area designated by the ski area operator and to refrain from acting in a manner which may cause or contribute to the injury of anyone. Responsibility for collisions by any skier while actually skiing, with any person or object, shall be solely that of each individual involved in the collision.

Walking Surfaces – Walk Like a Penguin to Avoid Slipping on Ice and Snow

Angel Fire Resort is located in a high alpine, mountain environment. Snowy and icy walkways and parking lots are common during the winter. Use caution walking especially in buildings, on walkways and in parking lots. Melting and freezing as well as water and snow accumulation, can cause surfaces to become slippery any time of the day or night. Try to clean the snow off the bottom of ski boots to help prevent a slip and fall. Use footwear with good tread and/or use commercially available products made for the bottom of shoes and boots to give better traction.